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Toba Inlet

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Toba Inlet waterfall

Toba Inlet

Toba Inlet is one of the principal inlets of the British Columbia Coast and on the edge of the Great Bear Rainforest. Toba Inlet is relatively short in comparison to the other coastal inlets, being only about 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) in average width and 35 km from the mouth of the powerful Toba River. The Inlet is a deep fjord and is flanked by towering mountains and several major cascading waterfalls.

Our Grizzly Bear Viewing Tours are guided by the Klahoose First Nation. We dock at the mouth of Toba and explore areas of the Klite River with its bear viewing towers, from which we witness Grizzly Bears feeding on salmon in their natural habitat.

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The first non-indigenous exploration of Toba Inlet occurred in 1792, when British and Spanish expeditions arrived in the area simultaneously. There was cooperation between the British under George Vancouver and the Spanish under Dionisio Alcalá Galiano. On June 24, 1792, Captain Dionisio Alcalá Galiano made the following log entry for his schooner Sutil: “At sunset, [Captain Cayetano] Valdés returned. He had followed the Canal de la Tabla and inspected the vicinity. [The inlet], which appeared [of] considerable [width] at its beginning, came to an end in a few leagues; its shores were very high, with sharp peaks, its depth great, and the inlets he saw were full of small islands. On its east shore, Valdés found a plank [tabla], for which he named the inlet and of which he made a drawing. It was covered with paintings, which were apparently hieroglyphics of the natives. He found some abandoned villages, but not one inhabitant.”

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Back grizzly bear through the trees

Below, is a Deep Roots story by producer, Roy L Hales, interviewing Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian, Judith Williams, the story behind Toba Inlet's name.

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